Terry Skolnik

E-Card

Terry Skolnik
Assistant Professor

Doctorate in Law, S.J.D. - University of Toronto (2018)
Master of Laws, L.L.M. - University of Cambridge (2013)
Licentiate in Law, L.L.L., summa cum laude - University of Ottawa (2012)
Diploma in Police Patrolling - École nationale de police du Québec (2011)

Room: 57 Louis-Pasteur, #325
Bureau: 613-562-5800, poste 3083
Courriel à l'Université d'Ottawa: terry.skolnik@uottawa.ca

Biography

Terry Skolnik is an assistant professor at the University of Ottawa's Faculty of Law, civil law section since 2018. He is also an affiliated scholar with NYU's Center for Human Rights and Global Justice (CHRGJ).

Prior to joining the Faculty, he was a scholar in residence at NYU's CHRGJ (2016-2018), a law clerk for the Honourable Justice Russell Brown at the Supreme Court of Canada (2015-2016), a lecturer at the civil law section of the University of Ottawa's Faculty of Law (2013-2014), and a police officer with the Service de police de la ville de Montréal (Montreal Police Service) (2012-2013).

Professor Skolnik completed the S.J.D. at the University of Toronto's Faculty of Law as a SSHRC Joseph-Armand Bombardier doctoral research fellow (2016-2018) and as a FRQSC doctoral research fellow (2014-2015). He is a graduate of the University of Cambridge where he studied as a Commonwealth Trust Scholar (L.L.M., 2013), and the University of Ottawa, Faculty of Law (L.L.L., summa cum laude, 2012). 

His primary research interests include criminal law, legal philosophy, constitutional law, criminal evidence and procedure, poverty law, property law, and the intersection between those fields.

In addition to English, Terry Skolnik is fluent in French, Italian, and Hebrew. 

Publications and conference proceedings
 
Peer reviewed and peer edited articles (10)
  • "Rethinking the Punishment of Homeless Offenders” (2019) 20 New Criminal Law Review [Forthcoming] (Peer reviewed) 
  • “How and Why Homeless People Are Regulated Differently ” (2018) 43 Queen’s Law Journal 297 (Peer reviewed) 
  • “Freedom and Access to Housing: Three Conceptions” (2019) WYAJ [Forthcoming] (Peer reviewed)
  • “Objective Mens Rea Revisited” (2017) 22 Canadian Criminal Law Review 315 (Peer edited)
  • “Improving the Law of Warrantless Cellphone Searches After R. v. Fearon” (2016) 49 Revue Juridique Thémis 825 (Peer reviewed)
  • “The Suspicious Distinction Between Reasonable Suspicion and Reasonable Grounds to Believe” (2016) 47 Ottawa Law Review 223 (Peer reviewed)
  • “Three Problems with Duress and Moral Involuntariness” (2016) 63 Criminal Law Quarterly 124 (Peer edited)
  • “Why There Should Be No Constitutional Right to Contact Counsel From A Police Car” (2014) 5 Western Journal of Legal Studies (Peer reviewed)
  • “R. v. MacDonald and the Illogicality of the Reasonable Belief Requirement for Safety Searches” (2015) 62 Criminal Law Quarterly 43 (Peer edited)
  • “Responsibility and Intervening Acts: What ‘Maybin’ an Overbroad Approach to Causation” (2014) 44 Revue Générale de Droit 557 (Peer reviewed) 

 

Other articles (2)
  • “Homelessness and the Impossibility to Obey the Law” (2016) 43 Fordham Urban Law Journal 741
  • "The Jury System in Canada" (2013) 17 Systemas Judiciales 16

 

Working papers (1) 
  • “Homelessness: A Problem of Public and Private Right”

 

Conference proceedings
  • "Toward A Theory of Expressively Egalitarian Regulation"
    Presented to: 
    - The NYU Center for Human Rights and Global Justice, NYU, New York, USA (April 23, 2018)
  • "Changing the Ways that Homelessness is Criminalized and Punished"
    Presented to: 
    - The NYU Center for Human Rights and Global Justice, NYU, New York, USA (June 29, 2017) 
  • "A Complementary Moral Basis for the Right to Housing: Protection Against Potential Domination and Punishment"
    Presented to:
    - The Third Annual Housing Law Symposium, University of Malmö, Malmö, Sweden (March 22, 2017)
  • "Persisting Trends in the Criminalization of Homelessness: A Comparative Historical Perspective"
    Presented to: 
    - Graduate Students in Law Association of the University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada (May 7, 2015)
  • " Is Criminal Negligence Morally Blameworthy?"
    Presented to: 
    - Criminal Law Students' Association of the University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada  (November 26, 2013)
  • "Taking Rights Seriously... or Seriously Taking Away Rights? A Comparative Study of Warrantless Search of Persons in England and Canada"
    Presented to:
    - The Cambridge University Commonwealth Society, Westminster College, Cambridge, UK (March 8, 2013)
Back to top