Research projects

Policy and practice in return to work after work injury: Challenging Circumstances and Innovative Solutions

 Research Program Summary

Professor Katherine Lippel has been awarded a joint CIHR−SSHRC Partnership Grant for a project entitled “Policy and practice in return to work after work injury: Challenging circumstances and innovative solutions.” The grant is part of the Healthy and Productive Work Initiative, overseen jointly by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research(CIHR) and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC).

 

Thanks to funding received from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research in the context of the Healthy and Productive Work competition, we have gathered a multi-disciplinary team of 14 academics, 17 partners and over 20 trainees to address the overarching policy question:

How can Canadian public policies promote better practices to ensure

sustainable return to work for all injured workers?

More specifically, seven research programs will examine the scope and effectiveness of regulated return to work policies and the application of those protections to three categories of workers. These include workers injured: 1) while working in non-standard employment (temporary, on-call, part-time, and self-employed workers); 2) while engaging in employment-related geographic mobility or 3) while working full time at minimum wage.

 

This research program’s scope currently includes workers living in Québec, Ontario and the Maritime Provinces and may expand to other Canadian provinces. When possible, we will include both unionized and non-unionized workers within the purview of our research, and partners are chosen accordingly.

 

We are also interested more broadly in the situation of workers suffering from either physical or mental health problems attributable to the workplace and in the roles of unions and workplaces in supporting return to work in light of the applicable policy frameworks.

 

Below are the 7 research programs, some of which include several projects:

1 - Classic legal analysis of rules governing injured workers' rights

Katherine Lippel, law professor at the University of Ottawa, Civil Law section

Rachel Cox, law professor at the Département des sciences juridiques, UQAM

 

2 - Precarious employment and return to work after work injury: an Ontario portrait 

Ellen MacEachen, professor at the School of Public Health and Health Systems, University of Waterloo

Partners: IAVGO Community Legal Clinic (IAVGO); Office of the Worker Adviser (OWA); Office of the Employer Advisor (OEA)

 

3 - Precarious employment and return to work after work injury: a Quebec portrait

Katherine Lippel, law professor at the University of Ottawa, Civil Law section

Partners : Union des travailleuses et travailleurs accidentés ou malades (UTTAM); Syndicat canadien de la fonction publique - Québec (SCFP-Québec)

 

4 - Employment-related geographic mobility and return to work after work injury

Barbara Neis, Sociology professor at Memorial University, and colleagues.

Partners: Newfoundland and Labrador Federation of Labour (NLFL)

 

5 - Tools for workplaces and unions to assist workers with physical or mental health problems to return to work 

Louise St-Arnaud, psychologist and professor at the Département des fondements et pratiques en éducation, Université Laval

Mariève Pelletier, Phd, vocational guidance counsellor and researcher at the Institut national de la santé publique du Québec

Katherine Lippel, law professor at the University of Ottawa, Civil Law section

Rachel Cox, law professor at the Département des sciences juridiques, UQAM

Partners : Institut national de santé publique du Québec (INSPQ), SCFP Québec, Canadian Labour Congress (CLC) and others

6 - Return to work, precarity and immigration/migration

Stephanie Premji, professor at the School of Labour Studies, McMaster University

Daniel Côté, researcher at the Institut de recherche Robert Sauvé en santé et sécurité du travail and adjunct professor at the Université de Montréal

Sylvie Gravel, professor of occupational health and safety in management studies at UQAM

Mircea Vultur, sociologist and researcher at the Institut national de la recherche scientifique

Janet McLaughlin, professor of Health Studies at Wilfrid Laurier University

Jenna Hennebry, professor at the Department of Communication Studies and School of International Policy and Governance, Wilfrid Laurier University

Partners: IAVGO Community Legal Clinic; Access Alliance

 

7 – Synthesis of empirical and legal studies to promote sustainable return to work for target populations Entire research team.

 

All of our studies include gender and intersectional lenses, seeking to ensure that academics and partners understand how policies and practices apply to women and men. This approach will include a consideration of work-family balance issues, at the time of determination of suitable post-injury employment, but also consideration of the segmented labour market, and the disproportionate presence of women in part time, temporary, and low wage employment.

 

Partners supporting this research program include governmental bodies (OWA, OEA, IAVGO), unions such as the CLC, the SCFP-Québec and the NLFL), non-governmental organizations (UTTAM, Access Alliance) and public health bodies such as the INSPQ. Their participation in research design and knowledge mobilisation will strengthen the research program and facilitate recruitment of new partners while providing economic support for our activities.

 

Professor Katherine Lippel is the Project Director of this research program and holds the Canada Research Chair on Occupational Health and Safety Law at the Faculty of Law, Civil Law Section at the University of Ottawa, klippel@uottawa.ca

Centre for Research on Work Disability Policy (CRWDP)
On the move

Employment-Related Geographical Mobility in the Canadian Context, a study on the health, social and legal effects of employment-related geographical mobility (E-RGM), featuring professors Delphine Nakache (Social Sciences), Ivy Bourgeault (Health Sciences) and Katherine Lippel (Law).


SSHRC supports postsecondary-based research, research training and knowledge mobilization activities in the social sciences and humanities.

CIHR Team in Gender, Environment and Health

This pan-Canadian interdisciplinary team was created in order to contribute to the development of new approaches and methods for the integration of sex and gender (s/g) in environmental and occupational health research.
Financed by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), this team is composed of researchers, partners and graduate students. It offers a place of support and discussion on concepts and methods related to the inclusion of s/g considerations in environmental and occupational health research.

The invisible that hurts

The interdisciplinary team L’invisible qui fait mal concentrates its research efforts on women's work and in particular on its least visible, most problematic aspects.  The objective of our research:  to describe faithfully the arduous tasks done by an increasing number of women and the difficulties they encounter when they try to claim their rights to health and safety at work.  We want to help them in their efforts to find solutions to these problems.

http://www.invisiblequifaitmal.uqam.ca/index_en.asp

Araucaria Project

“This work was carried out with support from the Global Health Research Initiative (GHRI), a collaborative research funding partnership of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, the Canadian International Development Agency, Health Canada, the International Development Research Centre, and the Public Health Agency of Canada.”


Literature on mental health and workplace health and safety 


Research, Policy and Practice with regard to work-related mental health problems in  Chile: a gender perspective.


 

Research Action Alliance on the Consequences of Work Injury

The mandate of the Alliance is to undertake research on the workers' compensation system and its role in the economic, social and health consequences of work injury. The Alliance builds on the expertise of all involved to produce insights into the compensation system that will influence policy development, education, and further investigation.

http://www.consequencesofworkinjury.ca/

Injured Workers' History Project report ( IWHP Bulletin #9 Final.pdf)

Workplace Safety & Insurance Board Research Advisory Council (WSIB RAC)

«Understanding the management of prevention and return to work in temporary work agencies », Ellen MacEachen, Agnieszka Kosny, Katherine Lippel, Ron Saunders 
Montant : $208,941 12/2009 to 6/2012

Temporary work agencies and workplace health and safety (CRSH)


«Workers’ compensation systems and their consequences for injured workers : A comparative study in Québec and Ontario on the role of doctors». K. Lippel et Joan Eakin (chercheures principales) et Lynn Holness
    Montant : 161 000$ (2009-2014)

EQCOTESST

Étude québécoise des conditions de travail, d'emploi et de SST (EQCOTESST)
http://www.irsst.qc.ca/en/_projet_3565.html

Le Journal de Montréal, Michel Munger, 20 août
Précarité d'emploi: Une plaie pour les travailleurs québécois 
Le Journal de Québec, Michel Munger, 20 août
Précarité d'emploi: Une plaie pour les travailleurs québécois 
TVA Nouvelles, Michel Munger, 20 août
La précarité, une plaie pour les travailleurs québécois

 

An ethnographic study of process and experience with Labour Market Re-Entry

MacEachen, E., Kosny, A., Lippel, K, Franche, R.L. "An ethnographic study of process and experience with Labour Market Re-Entry". Workplace Safety and Insurance Board of Ontario RAC.  2007-09

 

Les lois en santé-sécurité du travail pour la prévention des TMS

Les lois en sst et en ergonomie au Canada pour la prévention des troubles musculo-squelettiques : leur utilisation et leur portée, Sylvie Montreuil, Katherine Lippel, Geneviève Baril-Gingras

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